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2024 Cultures of the Americas Seminar

TU and Tulsa community join Gilcrease Museum and the Helmerich Center for American Research for the 2024 Cultures of the Americas Seminar. This event will feature Dr. Elizabeth N. Ellis (Princeton University) and focus on her award-winning book The Great Power of Small Nations: Indigenous Diplomacy in the Gulf South (Pennsylvania Press, 2022). Two additional guest speakers, Dr. Joshua Piker (College of William & Mary) and Dr. Farina King (University of Oklahoma), will frame the evening’s conversation about the book, its themes, and its importance. Dr. Ellis will respond to those comments with her own presentation. The remainder of the seminar will be open to public discussion with the author and guest speakers. We encourage attendees to read Dr. Ellis’s book before the seminar. You can purchase a copy here.

A free copy of the book will be given to the first 15 registrants!

Elizabeth Ellis is an associate professor of history at Princeton University. She is Peewaalia and is an enrolled citizen of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma. She specializes in early American and Native American history, and her research focuses on the seventeenth and eighteenth-century south. In addition to her work on early America, Liz writes about contemporary Indigenous issues and political movements and is committed to organizing and fighting for Indigenous self-determination.

Free parking is available in the Westby, West Residential, and McFarlin Library parking lots. You can find a University of Tulsa campus map here.

5:30 p.m. CST: Pre-Seminar Reception (Sharp Chapel Atrium)

6 p.m. CST: Cultures of the Americas Seminar (Ellen G. Adelson Auditorium in Tyrrell Hall)

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. Seating is limited. Virtual attendance available via Zoom. Register to attend virtually here.

Please contact Alex Patterson at 918-631-6412 or arp442@utulsa.edu with questions.

*This program is funded in part by Oklahoma Humanities (OH) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily represent those of OH or NEH.

HCAR Works-in-Progress Seminar: Dr. Benjamin Pokross

The Helmerich Center for American Research (HCAR) at Gilcrease Museum cordially invites all interested TU faculty, staff, and students to join us for our November Works-in-Progress (WIP) Seminar, featuring Benjamin Pokross, Ph.D., from The University of Tulsa.

Ben Pokross is the Duane H. King Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Tulsa’s Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum. His book project, Writing History in the Nineteenth-Century Great Lakes, asks what it meant to try and record the history of Indigenous people in nineteenth-century America. By analyzing four emergent genres of historical writing taken up by both Native and settler authors in the nineteenth century—the legend, the “traditional history,” the “textual memorial,” and the souvenir—this project argues that we can see the influence Indigenous people have always had in crafting their own histories. His research has been supported by fellowships from the University of Pennsylvania’s McNeil Center for Early American Studies, the Clements Library at the University of Michigan, the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, and the Newberry Library in Chicago.

In February’s seminar, Pokross will be sharing a draft of his article, “Memorial Forms: Copway’s American Indian and History in the Age of Information.” This article analyzes Mississauga Ojibwe minister and author George Copway’s short-lived newspaper, Copway’s American Indian, for what it can tell us about the potential for Native historical writing within settler-colonial print networks. I argue that Copway identifies what I call “memorialization”—the attempt to sum up and contain the history of Native America assumed to be passing away–as a print practice that delimited what could be said about the Native past and its meaning for the present. His newspaper contests this practice by embracing it, revealing the fissures and contradictions in memorialization’s attempt to eulogize Indigenous communities. Copway’s strategy is not without risk, but his attempt, I argue, shows us one way Native people in antebellum America sought to engage settler-colonial print forms for their own ends.

HCAR’s WIP Seminars foster a vibrant community of local and regional scholars, offering a platform to share creative work in an academically constructive environment. Each seminar revolves around pre-circulated drafts that participants read beforehand, followed by a roundtable discussion. Light refreshments will be served!

For those attending, an electronic copy of the paper will be available by November 3rd. You can access it through this link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WaofBSPOssFbSRhW9059vwmm6KNanRz-/view?usp=sharing

Acting: The Art of Being Human

TU community join The Oklahoma Center for the Humanities and hear from NYU’s Isaac Butler. He will join TU’s Dr. Justin Rawlins for a conversation about method acting at 101 Archer, in celebration of Rawlins’ new book “Imagining the Method: Reception, Identity, and American Screen Performance.”

Isaac Butler is the author of “The Method: How the 20th Century Learned to Act,” winner of the 2022 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, and the co-author of “The World Only Spins Forward: The Ascent of Angels in America,” which NPR named one of the best books of 2018. His writing has appeared in “New York magazine”, “Slate”, “the Guardian”, “American Theatre”, and other publications. He is the co-host of Slate’s “Working” podcast, and previously hosted “Lend Me Your Ears,” a podcast about Shakespeare and politics.

Genetics and the peopling of the Americas with Jennifer Raff

TU and Tulsa community are invited to join the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities for a lecture with Jennifer Raff. How and when did people first come to the American continents? In the last two decades, models to answer this question have been rapidly evolving. As researchers have worked to construct and test new models for the initial peopling of the Americas, they have increasingly incorporated evidence from the genomes of ancient peoples, which provide an archive of human population history. Ancient DNA has revealed a complex story of migrations, isolation, and adaptation, one which is still unfolding as more genomes are studied every year.

In this talk, we will examine the latest genetic and archaeological evidence for the origins of the First Peoples. We will piece together a story told by fragments of DNA recovered from a tooth in Siberia, by a small broken knife found deep below the surface of a muddy pond in Florida, by the footprints of children left thousands of years ago on the banks of an ancient lake in New Mexico. We will explore why the same pieces of evidence tell different stories to different groups of scholars.

A picture of this history is gradually coming into focus, but there are still many unanswered questions. We will discuss the future of genetics and archaeological research, and the ethical directions in which this field needs to go.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.

C. S. Lewis Book Club

TU students join us every Monday to read through books by C. S. Lewis and discuss their ideas. We’re currently reading “Perelandra,” the second book of Lewis’s Space Trilogy. Come and argue (um discuss) with us! We read it there so all you need to do is show up.