history - Events Calendar
Close Menu

history

Historical Trauma and Transformation Keynote Lecture

Dr. Tiya Miles, the Michael Garvey Professor of History at Harvard University, will present a keynote address to highlight the launch of The University of Tulsa’s new academic program, Historical Trauma and Transformation or H2T. The event is co-sponsored by TITAN and the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconcilation.

HCAR Works-in-Progress Seminar: Dr. Benjamin Pokross

The Helmerich Center for American Research (HCAR) at Gilcrease Museum cordially invites all interested TU faculty, staff, and students to join us for our November Works-in-Progress (WIP) Seminar, featuring Benjamin Pokross, Ph.D., from The University of Tulsa.

Ben Pokross is the Duane H. King Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Tulsa’s Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum. His book project, Writing History in the Nineteenth-Century Great Lakes, asks what it meant to try and record the history of Indigenous people in nineteenth-century America. By analyzing four emergent genres of historical writing taken up by both Native and settler authors in the nineteenth century—the legend, the “traditional history,” the “textual memorial,” and the souvenir—this project argues that we can see the influence Indigenous people have always had in crafting their own histories. His research has been supported by fellowships from the University of Pennsylvania’s McNeil Center for Early American Studies, the Clements Library at the University of Michigan, the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, and the Newberry Library in Chicago.

In February’s seminar, Pokross will be sharing a draft of his article, “Memorial Forms: Copway’s American Indian and History in the Age of Information.” This article analyzes Mississauga Ojibwe minister and author George Copway’s short-lived newspaper, Copway’s American Indian, for what it can tell us about the potential for Native historical writing within settler-colonial print networks. I argue that Copway identifies what I call “memorialization”—the attempt to sum up and contain the history of Native America assumed to be passing away–as a print practice that delimited what could be said about the Native past and its meaning for the present. His newspaper contests this practice by embracing it, revealing the fissures and contradictions in memorialization’s attempt to eulogize Indigenous communities. Copway’s strategy is not without risk, but his attempt, I argue, shows us one way Native people in antebellum America sought to engage settler-colonial print forms for their own ends.

HCAR’s WIP Seminars foster a vibrant community of local and regional scholars, offering a platform to share creative work in an academically constructive environment. Each seminar revolves around pre-circulated drafts that participants read beforehand, followed by a roundtable discussion. Light refreshments will be served!

For those attending, an electronic copy of the paper will be available by November 3rd. You can access it through this link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WaofBSPOssFbSRhW9059vwmm6KNanRz-/view?usp=sharing

HCAR Works-in-Progress Seminar: Cori Simon, Ph.D.

The Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum cordially invites all interested faculty, staff, and students to join us for our November Works-in-Progress (WIP) Seminar, featuring Cori Simon, Ph.D., from the University of Oklahoma.

Simon, an Assistant Professor of U.S. History at OU, specializes in Native North America, the U.S. West, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, and the nineteenth century. She holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a B.A. from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Simon is currently immersed in her first book manuscript, tentatively titled “Shadowland: Indian Territory’s Contested Past and Uncertain Future, 1800-1910.” This project delves into the history of Indian Territory, a place no longer seen on contemporary maps of North America. The manuscript explores its origins, evolution, and ultimate disappearance, using a borderlands framework to highlight the continuous contestation of this region throughout the nineteenth century.

In November’s seminar, Simon will be sharing a draft of her fourth book chapter, “Settler Intimacy,” which examines the transformation of western and central Indian Territory into the new Oklahoma Territory—a territory that was quickly settled in a series of rapid-fire land runs. The chapter follows the story of the Mayes family after they settled on land carved from the Sac and Fox reservation in 1891. As White-identified settlers, the Mayes family participated in early efforts to draw racial boundaries between settler and Native communities, but their lives demonstrated the ongoing significance of the relationships forged between these communities.

Our WIP Seminars foster a vibrant community of local and regional scholars, offering a platform to share creative work in an academically constructive environment. Each seminar revolves around pre-circulated drafts that participants read beforehand, followed by a roundtable discussion. Empanadas will be served as well as beverages!

For those attending, an electronic copy of the paper will be available by November 3rd. You can access it through this link: Link to the paper.

Fall 2023 Honors Symposium: “Virgil’s Messy & Messianic Eclogue in the Great Conversation”

TU students join the Honors College for our Fall 2023 Symposium! These gatherings provide a unique opportunity for honors students and faculty to enjoy good food, friendship, and informal conversation centered on classic texts, and exploring their importance in history and our modern world.

Join us for a special conversation with Julia Hejduk, Ph.D., of the Baylor Honors College! Hejduk will lead us through some short readings from the Roman poet Virgil’s Eclogues (and the later Italian Dante’s Purgatorio) to look at (potentially) prophetic pagan precursors to Christian Messianism, later Christian interpretations of these ideas, and their significance on the “Great Conversation” that has spanned the millennia.

Priority seating is given to Honors students and faculty. Location information and a free lunch will be provided for all registrants.

Defending Free Will Against Contemporary Skepticism

TU students and faculty join the Honors Program for a lecture by Mario DeCaro, professor of Moral Philosophy at Università Rome Tre. Since the year 2000, he has also been teaching at Tufts University, where he is regularly a visiting professor. He received his first degree and his Ph.D. in philosophy at University of Rome “La Sapienza.” He spent two years at MIT as a visiting graduate student and one at Harvard University as a Fulbright Fellow. He is associate editor of the “Journal of the American Philosophical Association” (Cambridge UP) and “Ancient Philosophy Today” (Edinburgh UP), and member of the editorial and scientific boards of several international journals.

In the past, very few thinkers denied the commonsense reality of human agency and moral responsibility. Recent findings in psychological and neuroscientific research, however, have cast doubt on the traditional position, and it appears that most scientists and philosophers agree that free will is only an illusion. With a growing number of contemporary arguments in favor of determinism, are we free to believe ourselves free?

A reception will follow the lecture. Please register here.

CineCulture Film Series

A Story of Bones Screening

Join the Office for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion as they partner with colleagues at CineCulture, POV, OSU Tulsa, Tulsa Community College, Circle Cinema, and the National Endowment for the Arts to bring you this quarterly film series. The first in the series is A Story of Bones.

Film synopsis:
As construction environmental officer for St. Helena’s troubled airport project, Annina van Neel learns about an unmarked mass burial ground of an estimated 9,000 formerly enslaved Africans. Haunted by this historical injustice, she and African American preservationist Peggy King Jorde fight for their proper memorialization, exposing the UK’s colonial past and present.

Free admission and a Q&A with special guest Kristi Williams after the film. Kristi is a Tulsa Race Massacre descendant and activist, chairperson of the Greater Tulsa African-American Affairs Commission, and a featured speaker for YWCA’s Stand Against Racism Campaign.

Reserve tickets online.

Why study the classics today?

Join Jennifer Frey and Kyle Harper for a robust inter-collegiate discussion on the Greco-Roman world. From sex, slavery, war, and plagues to religion, culture, and imperial power; why would we study such a foreign culture today? Nothing is off the table as these two discuss the ancient world and its relevance for our own time!

Venue information forthcoming.

Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture in History – Haunted by History: Columbus, Montezuma, Elton John, and St. George

Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture in History presents Haunted by History: Columbus, Montezuma, Elton John, and St. George.

Truth and evidence have been upended by postmodernism and the Internet.  Yet we still imagine that historical facts remain set in stone.  The past cannot be changed, right?  But what happens when historical figures or events have afterlives, when they continue to exist, evolve, and mutate like the undead?

In this brand-new lecture, Matthew Restall draws upon two of his recent books and two of his books-in-progress to explore what he calls hauntological history.  He argues that past and present perceptions of historical people and places haunt each other in ways that continually alter those perceptions.  Not only does the past change, but we seem unable to stop it changing.

A Genoese mariner whose fame/infamy rests on what he did 531 years ago (on the day of this lecture); an Aztec emperor misunderstood for five centuries; a Caribbean Sea battle celebrated since it occurred (or did it?) 225 years ago; a still-living veteran pop star.  Come and see how Restall meaningfully mixes these unlikely ingredients.