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Kendall Hall

Kendall Hall features two fully equipped theaters, a scene shop, costume shop and computer design lab. Chapman Theatre has a proscenium thrust stage and seats 375. It is equipped with a computerized lighting board and sound system.

601 South College Avenue, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104-9700

Phone

918-631-2566

Upcoming Events

TU Theatre Presents: 1984

In 1984, George Orwell created a dystopian landscape to examine the consequences of a totalitarian government ruling Great Britain. In this adaptation, the...

2/15/2018 8pm
TU Theatre Presents: 1984

In 1984, George Orwell created a dystopian landscape to examine the consequences of a totalitarian government ruling Great Britain. In this adaptation, the...

2/16/2018 8pm
TU Theatre Presents: 1984

In 1984, George Orwell created a dystopian landscape to examine the consequences of a totalitarian government ruling Great Britain. In this adaptation, the...

2/17/2018 8pm
TU Theatre Presents: 1984

In 1984, George Orwell created a dystopian landscape to examine the consequences of a totalitarian government ruling Great Britain. In this adaptation, the...

2/18/2018 2pm

Recent Events

Recent Activity

Earl Goodman Jr

Earl Goodman Jr left a positive review 4/10/2017

It was wonderful. I wish we could clone him and send them to all of the schools to stimulate interest in STE(A)M. I wonder how much he does at the various local secondary schools.

Shawna Gehres

Shawna Gehres left a positive review 4/10/2017

Fabulous!

seb199

seb199 left a review 1/23/2017

Lasted for about 1.3 hours. Was pretty good.

Goss, Veronica Elaine

Goss, Veronica Elaine left a positive review 1/28/2016

It was a great play. All the actors did a wonderful job and the set was amazing!

Kendall Hall

Kendall Hall posted a photo 6/8/2015

William W Morgan

William W Morgan left a positive review 4/13/2015

It was great. 60 years ago I learned of the hazards and problems of "standing waves" in radio antennas. But this was sort of an abstract thing without much meaning. But last night, Prof McCoy showed me an actual standing wave... a wave stopped, stuck, just standing there. And I remember gyros and accelerometers the size of a clothes dryer. Then the size of my fist, which was very advanced stuff. And useful. But now, the ones in an iPad must required a microscope to see them? Prof McCoy's show brought the natural world much closer, ever-more meaningful and nice.